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20 Topics on Domestic Violence/Sexual Abuse in Indian Reservations for a Critical Essay

If you are tasked with writing a critical essay or a literary analysis on Domestic Violence/Sexual Abuse in Indian Reservations, the first step is finding a great topic. But this step can often seem the hardest which is why you we provide you with a list of potential critical essay topics below.

With them you might be able to write your next essay:

  1. Punishments for Non-Natives Living within Indian Reservations Who Are Convicted of Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations
  2. Punishments for Non-Natives Living in Indian Reservations Who Are Convicted of Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations
  3. Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence Laws on Different Reservations and how They Compare to The State Laws for Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence Laws in Which the Reservation Is Located
  4. Why Perpetrator Rates for Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations Is Heavily Non-Native
  5. Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence Laws on Different Reservations and how They Compare to the State Laws for Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence Laws in which the Reservation Is Located
  6. Causes of Higher Rates in Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations Compared to Other Areas Regulated by State and Federal Authorities
  7. Why Perpetrator Rates for Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations are High for Non-Native
  8. Causes of Higher Rates in Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations Compared to Other Areas Regulated by State and Federal Authorities
  9. Solutions Enforced by The U.S. Government to Reduce the High Rates of Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations Compared to All Other Areas of The United States
  10. Does The U.S. Government Have the Authority to Stop or Help in Reducing Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations
  11. Punishments for Non-Natives Living in Indian Reservations who Are Convicted of Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations
  12. Punishments for Non-Natives Living off Indian Reservations who Are Convicted Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations
  13. Physical and Mental Health Options for Victims of Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations.
  14. Why Perpetrators who Are Intimate with Victims Engage in Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations
  15. Solutions Enforced by The U.S. Government to Reduce the High Rates of Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations Compared to All Other Areas of The United States?
  16. Does The U.S. Government have the Authority to Stop or Help Reduce Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations?
  17. Physical and Mental Health Options for Victims of Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations
  18. What Causes Perpetrators Who Are Intimate With Victims to Engage in Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations
  19. Cultural Differences in Legal Perception of Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence in Indian Reservations
  20. Cultural Differences in Legal Perception of Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations

Aren’t those useful topics? With those in mind you might be able to find an idea that best suits your project requirements or writing demands. You can also find our 10 selected facts about domestic violence and sexual abuse in Indian reservations for your critical essay as well as a separate guide on how to plan it. Also below you will find a sample essay on one of the topics above which can help you to better understand the writing process:

Sample Critical Essay: Punishments for Non-Natives Living Off Indian Reservations Who Are Convicted Domestic Assault/Domestic Violence in Indian Reservations

The US take convictions for domestic assault and violence very seriously. Whether the state has an Indian reservation within its borders or not does not change the severity of the charges, or punishment. For a citizen who does not live in the Indian reservation, but commits such an act while on one, the jurisdiction for punishment will generally fall to the state authorities who prosecute it, just as any domestic abuse/violence charge.

“Domestic abuse battery” is the legal term for any violent crime against an acquaintance. If an individual uses force or violence against another member of their household, it is considered legally to be domestic abuse. This can include anyone within the household, opposite sex or the same sex, spouse or significant other. Anyone who has ever resided in the same household with the accused, including children, can legally fall victim to domestic violence. This extends to a child who has lived with the accused at any point over the last five years or any child of the accused even one who does not live with them full time.

Anyone who is charged with such a crime can face, in some states, a fine in the amount between three hundred and one thousand dollars. The jail sentencing for such a crime can be between ten days and six months. These minimum punishments can be changed if the court decides to offer probation for the convicted, something which requires them to have spent two days in jail, agreeing to go into a treatment program, and not having a firearm during this period in their possession. The state punishment can also be altered should the convicted be put on probation after the completion of four separate days of eight full hours at community service, in addition to which the convicted has to enter into a domestic abuse program. These two alterations to the minimum state sentencing are offered generally to fire time offenders. Any individual who is convicted a second time can opt to change the sentencing to include fifteen days in jail after which they are on probation, assuming they agree to serve thirty days of community service each of which lasts eight hours, and agree to enter into an abuse prevention program. The punishment for those on reservations is, again, contingent upon the local Native American authorities.

In all states, there is no sharp increase in domestic abuse in large part because of the severity of the punishment in the event of being charged. This is not the same for reservations where the rates of abuse are twice as high for native women as they are for any other group, located in any other type of environment. That said, the system is divided in terms of jurisdiction in order to acquiesce to the cultural demands of the local populations and make some form of reparations. However, it seems that this is not resulting in effective change, or any change for that matter. At this juncture, there need to be oversight committees in place to ensure the local reservation authorities are doing their job effectively, and after this trial period of oversight, if things have not improved significantly, there must be government intervention to put a stop to this horrific crime.

References:

Bachman, Ronet. Death and violence in the reservation: Homicide, family violence, and suicide in American Indian populations. Abc-clio, 1992.
Bachman, R., Zaykowski, H., Kallmyer, R., Poteyeva, M., and Lanier, C. (2008). Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and the criminal justice response: What is known. Unpublished grant report to the US Department of Justice. Available from: www.ncjrs.govfiles1/nij/grants/223691.
Hamby, Sherry L. “The importance of community in a feminist analysis of domestic violence among American Indians.” American journal of community psychology 28.5 (2000): 649-669.
Norton, Ilena M., and Spero M. Manson. “Domestic violence intervention in an urban Indian health center.” Community Mental Health Journal 33.4 (1997): 331-337.
Norton, Ilena M., and Spero M. Manson. “A silent minority: Battered American Indian women.” Journal of Family Violence 10.3 (1995): 307-318.
Roman, David. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN INDIAN RESERVATIONS. Diss. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY, 2015.
Tjaden, P., & Thoennes, N. (2000). Full report of the prevalence, incidence, and consequences of violence against women: Findings from the National Violence Against Women Survey [NCJ 183781]. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice & the US Department of Health and Human Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available from: www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles1/nij/183781.txt.

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